A Curse Dark as Gold

A Curse Dark as Gold. What an intriguing title, and an intriuging read as well. I was curious about this book, because I knew it was a fantasy with the feel of historical fiction. My current project is historical fiction with fantasy elements, and I wanted to see how Elizabeth C. Bunce, the author, handled the […]

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Skeletons at the Feast

I haven’t read anything by Chris Bohjalian since MIDWIVES. Not for any particular reason; I was just busy reading other things. A few months ago, I listened to an interview with him about his newest book, SKELETONS AT THE FEAST. I was so taken with his description of the story and how he came to write […]

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Jane Austen Birthday Celebration

The pleasure of sipping tea and eating scones with Devonshire cream at the Brown Palace Hotel. What more could you ask? Celebrating Jane Austen’s life, books, and characters was the real reason for gathering at the Brown Palace. Every year the Denver/Boulder Regional Chapter (and probably many other chapters) of the Jane Austen Society of North […]

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Christmas Book Recommendations

Ah, what better gift to give and receive than a book? At least, that’s what all the bookstores and publishers are telling us lately. I’m not including the obvious, such as the Twilight series, or Harry Potter, since I’m sure nearly everyone in existence has already read them (and seen the movies). Here are a […]

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Graceling

I just finished reading GRACELING, by Kristin Cashore. Even though I’m not a big fantasy reader, I decided to give it a try because of the great press it was getting. Boy, am I glad I did! It’s one of the best YA’s I’ve read. Ever. It’s got everything–a strong, vibrant main character, plenty of action […]

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Shakespeare Trivia

Here are some fun facts about Shakespeare I’ve learned in recent research: Other than his christening in 1564, there is no recorded information about Shakespeare until his marriage. He married a 26-year-old woman named Anne Hathaway when he was 18, in 1562. They had a daughter, Susanna, and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Shakespeare left Stratford-upon-Avon, […]

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Catcher in the Rye and High School English

Recently on Weekend Edition, Scott Simon interviewed a professor from Oberlin, Anne Trubek, about an article she’d written for Good magazine. She believes The Catcher in the Rye should be retired as part of the English/Language Arts curriculum in high schools. Today’s students no longer identify with Holden Caulfield, a white, upper class, prep school […]

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